Move On

Today, MoveOn.org will go dark. No news, no information, no resources.
Why? Because we’re protesting Internet censorship.
Websites all over the Internet, including sites like YouTube and even MoveOn.org, could be made unavailable if big entertainment companies, the Chamber of Commerce, and their lobbyists get their way by ramming Internet censorship legislation through the Senate.
That’s why today, Wednesday, January 18, we’re joining Reddit, Wikipedia, Mozilla, WordPress, TwitPic, Boing Boing, and thousands of other sites and blacking out MoveOn.org in protest.1  You can participate in the blackout too and show the world tomorrow why you oppose Internet censorship. 
Do you have a website?  You can join in too.
Last summer, these greedy corporations and their lobbyists thought they could wave their wallets and pass whatever bill they wanted that would harm the Internet. But over 230,000 MoveOn members, along with hundreds of thousands of other activists, spoke loudly at the end of 2011, letting Congress know that we would not support Internet censorship. The result of this was a significant weakening of support for the bill in the House.2 
They heard us then, and the Senate needs to a strong statement from us now because they’re set to vote on this bill on January 24.
So we’re taking tomorrow to show just what the Internet would look like in an Internet censorship era. If you don’t like it, let everyone you’re connected to online know tomorrow. Then stay tuned for the next phase of this fight. 
Thanks for all you do.
–Garlin, Elena, Peter, Mark, and the rest of the team

OOO

Thanks to our reader James W for the head’s up on this.
 
Sources:
1. “Wikipedia Blackout: Websites Wikipedia, Reddit, Others Go Dark Wednesday to Protest SOPA, PIPA,” ABC News, January 17, 2012
http://www.moveon.org/r?r=269602&id=&id=34811-11347599-j6tJEPx&t=6
2. “SOPA on hold, PIPA may be weakened as Congress revisits the bills.” InfoWorld, January 16, 2012
http://www.moveon.org/r?r=269603&id=34811-11347599-j6tJEPx&t=7
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